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James Melton

Show Count: 0
Series Count: 3
Role: Old Time Radio Star
Old Time Radio
Born: January 2, 1904, Moultrie, Georgia, USA
Died: April 21, 1961 , New York City, New York, USA

James Melton (January 2, 1904 – April 21, 1961), a popular singer in the 1920s and early 1930s, later began a career as an operatic singer when tenor voices went out of style in popular music around 1932-35. His singing talent was similar to that of Richard Crooks,John Charles Thomas or Nelson Eddy.

Melton usually catered to popular music fan, singing romantic songs and popular ballads with in a sweet style. He was born inMoultrie, Georgia but was raised in Citra, Florida, where his parents grew melons and handled hogs.

In 1920, he graduated from high school in Ocala, Florida and then attended college at the University of Florida, Vanderbilt Universityand the University of Georgia. He received vocal instruction from Gaetano de Luca in Nashville from 1923 to 1927 before moving to New York where he studied with Beniamino Gigli's teacher, Enrico Rosati. Melton also worked in dance bands, playing saxophone in a college jazz ensemble and performing with Francis Craig's Orchestra in Atlanta in 1926.

Radio

The following year, he began singing on New York radio for no pay. He joined "Roxy's Gang", a cabaret group led by Samuel Roxy Rothafel, who worked with the Sieberling Singers. He made records for Victor Records, singing as one of the tenors with The Revelers and for Columbia Records with the same group under the pseudonym of The Singing Sophomores. He frequently sang with popular singer Jane Froman and appeared with her in film as well.

Melton recorded his first songs under his own name for Columbia in the autumn of 1927. He quickly became a popular singer and made numerous vocal recordings as well as singing vocal choruses for dance records. By 1931, the Great Depression along with the rise of conservatism and a religious revival initiated a movement to more masculine sounding voices in popular music. Singers such as Franklyn Baur, Nick Lucas and Scrappy Lambert saw their careers diminish, while baritones such as Bing Crosby and Russ Columbo became popular. Tenor voices became viewed as outdated in popular music. Melton was forced to change paths and decided to try to continue his career with classical music. He began to train his voice with help from the pianist Michael Raucheisen in Berlin and gave his first concert performance at Town Hall on April 22, 1932 in New York and embarked on an American and Canadian concert tour along with songwriter George Gershwin in 1934.

Melton continued to perform on the radio. He was heard on The Firestone Hour in 1933, on Ward's Family Theater in 1935, The Sealtest Sunday Night Party (1936), The Palmolive Beauty Box Theater (1937), The Song Shop (1938), the Bell Telephone Hour (1940), Texaco Star Theater (1944) and Harvest of Stars (1945).

Films

Although not distinguished as a dramatic actor, he also appeared in movies, including Stars Over Broadway (1935), Sing Me a Love Song (1936), Melody for Two (1937) and theMGM revue, Ziegfeld Follies (1946).

Opera

After voice training with Angelo Canarutto, Melton's operatic singing career took off in 1938 when he appeared with the Cincinnati Zoo Opera Company as Pinkerton in Puccini'sMadama Butterfly and also with the St. Louis Opera Company as Alfredo in Verdi's La Traviata. In 1939, he sang Pinkerton for his debut with the Philadelphia La Scala Opera Company with Annunciata Garrotto as Cio-cio-san. He worked with the Chicago Civic Opera from 1940 to 1942, appearing with Helen Jepson in Madama Butterfly, with Lily Pons inDonizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor, with Risë Stevens in Mignon and in Flotow's Martha. On 7 December 1942, Melton debuted at the Metropolitan Opera as Tamino in Mozart's The Magic Flute. He continued to perform at the Met through 1950.

Melton spent the 1950s making records, singing in nightclubs, appearing on television, including Ford Festival (1951–1952) also known as The James Melton Show, and collecting rare automobiles. His last stage production was Sigmund Romberg's The Student Prince.

Later life

He established the Autorama, an auto museum in Hypoluxo, Florida. Ken Purdy interviewed him on his collection and wrote a book about it. The museum's collection was dispersed after his death. Melton has two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, one for radio and the other for recording. He died in New York City from pneumonia.

Source: Wikipedia

Bob Hope ShowBob Hope Show
Show Count: 43
Broadcast History: 4 January 1935 to 5 April 1935, 14 September 1935 to 3 September 1936, 9 May 1937 to 26 September 1937, 8 December 1937 to 23 March 1938, 27 September 1938 to 8 June 1948, 14 September 1948 to 13 June 1950, and 3 October 1950 to 21 April 1955
Sponsor: Emerson Drug Company, Bromo Seltzer, Atlantic Oil, Lucky Strike, Swan Soap, American Dairy, General Foods, Woodbury Soap
Cast: Bob Hope, James Melton, Jane Froman, Patricia Wilder, Frank Parker, Jerry Colonna, Blanche Stewart, Elvia Allman, Doris Day, Frances Langford, Barbara Jo Allen, Stan Kenton, Skinnay Ennis, Desi Arnaz, Les Brown
Director: Bill Lawrence, Norman Morrell, Bob Stephenson, Al Capstaff
Producer: Bill Lawrence, Norman Morrell, Bob Stephenson, Al Capstaff
Texaco Star TheaterTexaco Star Theater
Show Count: 2
Broadcast History: 1938 to 1949
Cast: Fred Allen, Ed Wynn, James Melton
Director: William A. Bacher
Host: Adolphe Menjou, Ken Murray, John Barrymore